Community donors help bring archery to UWM

Archery Classes. The class takes place at Kenwood United Methodist Church, Basement Gym. 2319 E. Kenwood Blvd

The College of Health Sciences (CHS) Outreach Office offers a wide variety of sport and recreation classes. Thanks to the generosity of community donors, CHS Outreach now offers a new class in archery, which is one of the oldest sports known to humans and is still enjoyed by many today.

This archery class teaches students the basic fundamentals of archery, including stance, draw and release, and then how to fine tune their archery skills for sport and recreational activity. The class also covers all aspects of safety while participating in archery. In addition, students are involved in the maintenance of equipment and participate in a final competition between peers.

UWM Students take aim at newly offered archery class. Original photo’s by Trove Fox.

Archery Classes. The class takes place at Kenwood United Methodist Church, Basement Gym. 2319 E. Kenwood Blvd

Archery Classes. The class takes place at Kenwood United Methodist Church, Basement Gym. 2319 E. Kenwood Blvd

Archery Classes. The class takes place at Kenwood United Methodist Church, Basement Gym. 2319 E. Kenwood Blvd

The Benefits of Archery

Archery is a great sport for boosting physical, mental and social health. It also improves patience and emphasizes the importance of safety and responsibility for one another and for the equipment being used. Both able bodied persons and persons with disabilities can participate in the sport. Beyond mere enjoyment, the sport also demonstrates the need for improving upper body strength.

Along with building physical strength, archery requires mental fitness, including focus, flexibility and attention skills. Archery teaches the benefits of teamwork and offers the opportunity to compete against others. The sport also provides students with an opportunity to look beyond their mobile/technology devices (cell phones, computers, etc.) to establish comradery and community through sport.

Shane Sauls, a student who recently completed the course, emphasized the wide-ranging applicability of a class like this, stating, “Archery is something that I’ve been interested in for a while but I’ve never had the opportunity to try it out. It taught me a lot about the history of archery and the proper technique required to become a good archer. I plan on using what I learned in class to begin bow hunting in the near future.”

Currently, there are 46 students enrolled in the archery classes. Students are required to practice their archery skills beyond the classroom and to log their hours. They must also write a paper related to archery and create something related to archery, such as a quiver, arrow, bow or arm guard.

Thanks to our donors

Although archery is a relatively inexpensive sport, there are startup expenses for teaching the sport which requires bows, arrows, targets and other essential equipment. Recently several gifts were made to assist the College in implementing its archery program.  The Wisconsin Chapter of Safari Club International’s gave $1,500 and the National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP) donated $750.

Assistant Dean for Outreach Nancy Nelson, PhD, MBA, OTR, CHT, said, “We are grateful to these organizations. Their generous gifts will help us purchase equipment for our archery program and benefit many students to come.”